A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment, Week(1-6) , All Quiz Answers with Assignment.

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A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment






Week 1 Assignment :

1. What is your definition of happiness? Please write your answer below.

The warm, positive vibe that makes the world around brighter is the feeling of happiness.

2. What makes you happy in the way that you have defined it? (List 3 – 4 things/activities). Please write your answer below.

1) Helping others 
2) Feeling of being loved
3) Eating something delicious 
4) Drawing cartoon characters 
5) Being able to understand and apply concepts learnt at school to solve tough question


Week 3 Assignment :

1. What was your idea/plan?

I donated a food package for some low-paid workers who are affected by Covid-19 in my hometown.


2. How did you execute the idea? Did you stick to the "3 rules for giving" (contain cost of giving, have fun, and register impact)? If not, why not?


First of all, I reached out to my friends and colleagues who originated from the same town but currently living in other cities and well-earning. I coordinated gathering the charity from these friends (for 2 weeks period). Once the fund was collected, I asked some friends who are living in the hometown to prepare the food package and The recipient felt really grateful and kept pray. 


3. What did the recipient feel? In answering this question focus on what the recipient said/did when he/she experienced your act.

The recipient felt really grateful and kept praying for the givers' health and rizq (wealth). It made us feel that our little help could give some relief for others. 


4. How did it make you feel? What effect did the entire exercise have on you?

I feel good at helping others, It makes me feel pleasant experiences . It encourages me in many ways
It helps me in my humanity growth.


Week 5 Assignment :


1. Overall, how easy or difficult was this exercise for you? Why? 

The exercise was mildly easy and it took time to think but overall it was good.


2. How much more (or less) confident do you now feel that no event or outcome is “purely” positive or negative? Why (or why not)?

Actually, now I feel that no event is perfectly positive or perfectly negative, it is up to us to convert the joy and fraternity of the moment.


3. Typically, those who do this exercise can more spontaneously see the positive consequences triggered by negative events. Did this happen to you? (Please elaborate.)

Yeah...I actually get to know that there is no completely negative event , if we want we can convert it to positive


Week 6 Assignment :


1. a.

A big reason why many of us commit the fundamental happiness paradox is because we harbor negative misconceptions about happiness. Mention at least two such negative misconceptions and provide some support for why they aren’t valid. That is, refer to at least one research finding (you don’t need to cite the paper) that indicates that the negative misconception is invalid.(3 point)

The three negative misconceptions we discussed are:i. Happiness leads to lazinessii. Happiness leads to selfishness, andiii. Happiness is fleeting Findings show that happier people are, in fact, more productive and successful than those who are less happy. Specifically, here’s what findings show:• Happier insurance agents sell more insurance• Happy employees earn more• Happier (optimistic) CEOs foster a more positive work-climate, which in turn improves organizational productivity• Happier CEOs receive higher performance ratings from chairpersons of their boards and head companies with greater returns on investment,• Happier batsmen in Cricket have higher batting averagesSo, the idea that happiness leads to laziness is not valid. Findings also show that happiness does not lead to selfishness; in fact, it leads to altruism. Specifically, here’s what findings show:• Happy people volunteer more for social causes• Happy people are more likely to judge others favorably,• and are more willing to share their good fortune with others more equitably• People feeling happy contribute more money to charity; they are also more likely to donate bloodand my favorite, because I am always looking for participants to run my experiments Happy people are more likely to volunteer for an extra experiment Finally, although many people believe that happiness can’t last long—that is, it is fleeting—it turns out that a lot depends on how one defines happiness. If one defines it more along the lines of love/connection or abundance, happiness has the potential to last much longer than if one equates it to sensory pleasure or hubristic pride.


1b.

Viktor Frankl, the gentleman who wrote, Man’s search for meaning, is reputed to have said, “Don't aim at success. The more you aim at it and make it a target, the more you are going to miss it. For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue…”

Frankl’s quote suggests that it’s better not to pursue happiness. Please indicate whether you agree or disagree with Frankl’s statement and justify your position by referring to relevant findings. (2 points.)

I agree with Frankl because findings indicate that, while it is important to prioritize happiness, it’s equally important not to pursue (or chase it) because, findings show that when one pursues happiness, one is likely to be less happy as a result. Specifically, pursuing happiness leads one to compare one’s current happiness levels with one’s ideal happiness levels, and such a comparison has been shown to lower happiness levels.


2. a.

In Week 2 of the course, 3 characteristics of flow were discussed. Mention two of the three and, using an example (e.g., game of Tennis), describe one of these two features. (3 points.)

The three characteristics of flow that were discussed are:i. Paradoxical perception of timeii. Loss of self-consciousness, andiii. Focus on the present moment (sub-goal—or sub-sub-goal) An example of paradoxical perception of time is that, during flow, time can seem to slow down so that you feel as is everything is going in slow motion. E.g., if you experience flow as you are playing tennis, you might feel that the ball is coming towards you in slow motion, and that you are able to see the fur on the ball. However, once the game is over, you might feel that time went by really fast. So, for example, you might even miss lunch or a subsequent appointment when you are caught in flow. Another feature of flow is the lack of self-consciousness. During flow, you don’t have that “inner voice” or “judge” commenting on how well or poorly you are doing the thing that you are doing. So, you won’t be evaluating yourself as you are engaged in the activity. The reason for this has to do with the fact that flow moments happen when you are “stretched”; so, you don’t have any excess capacity left over to judge or evaluate how you are doing: being in flow takes everything you got. A final feature of flow is that you are intensely focused on the present moment. Say, for example, that you are climbing up a rock face and your eventual goal is to have a picnic lunch with a friend. If you are in flow, you wouldn’t be thinking about this eventual goal; your attention would be focused on the next sub-goal or sub-sub-goal—e.g., whether you need to powder your hands or which shrub to hold on to as you hoist yourself up the rock face.


2. b.

A remarkable feature of flow is that almost everyone has experienced it. Another remarkable feature is that it can be experienced so long as a simple condition is met. What is that condition? Be specific. (2 points.)

Flow is experienced when required ability (to do a task) is matched by available ability. More specifically, flow is most likely when required ability is just above available ability; thus, one is made to stretch a little bit beyond what one already knows—that’s when flow is most likely


3. a.

The Dalai Lama is supposed to have said, “If you want to make others happy, be compassionate. If you want to be happy yourself, be compassionate.”

Would you agree with this statement? In answering this question, please refer to at least two of the many findings we discussed on the impact that being kind and compassionate has on happiness. (2 points.)

I agree with the Dalai Lama’s statement since numerous findings have shown that being loving and giving—that is, being kind and compassionate—makes us happy. Here are the findings that we discussed:- One study, conducted by Prof. Norton and his co-author showed that students given $5 or $20 were happier when they spent it on others than on themselves;- Another study, using Gallup poll data, showed that in a vast majority of countries (120 of 136 countries), those who donated to charity in the previous month were significantly happier than those who didn’t; Yet another study showed that even toddlers are happier when they are kind and generous than when they are not; in this study, toddlers were given some Goldfish crackers and asked to consume it themselves or to feed it to a (puppet) monkey; toddlers who gave away their goldfish (to the monkey) were happier than those who consumed it themselves.- Other studies have shown that being kind and generous impacts success. Givers (otherish givers, to be specific), for example, are much more likely to rise to the top of their organizations than are takers or matchers. Likewise, findings by economist Arthur Brooks showed that those who donate $1 to charity end up earning $3.75 in return.


3. b.

Consider this statement: Givers are always more successful than takers or matchers. Do you agree with the statement? Justify your answer by referring to relevant findings. (2 points)

Givers aren’t necessarily always more successful than takers or matchers. A lot depends on what type of giver you are. Findings show that it is otherish givers, rather than selfless givers who rise up to the top of their organizations.The reason for this is because otherish givers are less likely to burnout—since they take care of themselves too (and not just others) by including themselves in the “circle of generosity.”


4. a.

We discussed several reasons why seeking to control others and outcomes lowers happiness levels. Mention at least three reasons and elaborate on them. (3 points)

Yes, I do agree with this statement. The statement means that, the more internal control one has, the less external control one will seek. There are several studies that are consistent with this idea. For example, the dissertation studies of Prof. Raghunathan show that our desire for external control goes up when we lack control over our feelings—e.g., when we feel stressed out or anxious. In one study (conducted by Prof. Raghunathan), participants were asked to list the things that they would like to do when they feel anxious and stressed. Findings showed that people’s tendency to seek external control—e.g., get the space around them organized, try to get to the bottom of the problem that’s making them feel anxious, etc.—was higher when they felt stressed. The reverse has been shown too: it is when we feel that we don’t have a sufficiently high level of control over our external environment that we seek ways of taking internal control. This is one reason why being spiritual or religious helps. Findings from one study by Pollner showed that that one reason why religious people are happier that non-religious people is because their belief in God gives them a sense of vicarious control over external circumstances. Similarly, people tend to become more superstitious when they are put under stress. This happens is because the superstition acts like a crutch; it gives people a sense of internal reassurance when they lack control over the external situation


4. b.

“Internal and external control are compensatory forces.” What does this statement mean and do you agree with it? Justify your answer by referring to relevant studies/findings that show that internal and external control are compensatory in nature (or not). (2 points.)

Yes, I do agree with this statement. The statement means that, the more internal control one has, the less external control one will seek. There are several studies that are consistent with this idea. For example, the dissertation studies of Prof. Raghunathan show that our desire for external control goes up when we lack control over our feelings—e.g., when we feel stressed out or anxious. In one study (conducted by Prof. Raghunathan), participants were asked to list the things that they would like to do when they feel anxious and stressed. Findings showed that people’s tendency to seek external control—e.g., get the space around them organized, try to get to the bottom of the problem that’s making them feel anxious, etc.—was higher when they felt stressed. The reverse has been shown too: it is when we feel that we don’t have a sufficiently high level of control over our external environment that we seek ways of taking internal control. This is one reason why being spiritual or religious helps. Findings from one study by Pollner showed that that one reason why religious people are happier that non-religious people is because their belief in God gives them a sense of vicarious control over external circumstances. Similarly, people tend to become more superstitious when they are put under stress. This happens is because the superstition acts like a crutch; it gives people a sense of internal reassurance when they lack control over the external situation.


5. a.

What do findings by John Helliwell and his co-authors reveal about the relationship between trust and happiness of countries? The “wallet drop” study conducted by The Toronto Star reveals an interesting fact about trust. Mention this interesting fact and then, based on this fact, draw an implication for “exercising smart trust.” (2 points.)

 Findings showed that people’s tendency to seek external control—e.g., get the space around them organized, try to get to the bottom of the problem that’s making them feel anxious, etc.—was higher when they felt stressed. The reverse has been shown too: it is when we feel that we don’t have a sufficiently high level of control over our external environment that we seek ways of taking internal control. This is one reason why being spiritual or religious helps. Findings from one study by Pollner showed that that one reason why religious people are happier that non-religious people is because their belief in God gives them a sense of vicarious control over external circumstances. Similarly, people tend to become more superstitious when they are put under stress. This happens is because the superstition acts like a crutch; it gives people a sense of internal reassurance when they lack control over the external situation.


5. b.

What’s the difference among “obsessive pursuit of passion,” “indifferent pursuit of passion” and “dispassionate pursuit of passion” when it comes to how outcomes are judged? In which category do most of us fall? Finally, why is indifferent pursuit of passion not possible? (3 points.)


Obsessive pursuit of passion involves judging outcomes both before and after they occur. Indifferent pursuit of passion involves not judging outcomes either before or after they occur. Dispassionate pursuit of passion involves having a preference for certain outcomes over others before they occur, but not judging them as good or bad after they occur.Most of us fall in the 1st category: obsessive pursuit of passion. That is, we tend to seek certain outcomes over others because we judge them to be good (or better) and we also judge certain outcomes as “good” and other outcomes as “bad” they occur.Indifferent pursuit of passion is not possible because it’s impossible not to have pre-occurrence preference. That is, whether we like it or not, and whether we know it or not, we are going to have preferences (e.g., for eating food, scratching an itch, etc.)


6. a.

In Week 6 of the course, we discussed the many positive consequences of practicing mindfulness. Mention at least three such benefits—one in each of the following three categories: i) physical health, ii) mental health (well-being or happiness), and iii. Success. (3 points)

There are, indeed, many beneficial consequences from practicing mindfulness. On the physiological side, they include the following:i. Better heart health (through strengthening of vagal tone)ii. Lower inflammation (leading to lower stress)iii. Mitigation in the shortening of telomeres (which protects our DNA strands)iv. Slowing down of age-related brain lossOn the mental (well-being/happiness) side, they include:i. Lower stressii. Greater compassion (due to strengthening of Vagal tone and through activation of insular cortex)iii.slowing down of adaptationiv. Greater curiosity and interest even in every day (ordinary) thingsv. Greater likelihood of experiencing awe, which increases perceived “time abundance,” enhancing happiness levelsFinally, for success, they include: i. Increased response flexibility, leading to better/more mature decisionsii. Greater emotional intelligence


6. b.

There are many “paradoxes of mindfulness”. Mention one of these paradoxes and briefly explain why it is only an apparent—and not an actual—paradox. (2 points)

happening and, at the same time, seems to involve getting more intimately in touch with what’s happening, ii) that accepting or embracing a negative feeling should make one feel better rather than worse, and finally, iii) that mindfulness would lead to a loss of spontaneity since it improves “response flexibility.” All of these are apparent (and not real) paradoxes for the following reasons:First, mindfulness involves “distancing” from the stance of “bare awareness” and not from the stance of the “mind.” From the standpoint of the mind, distancing (or observing) involves judging, commenting, categorizing etc. This imposes a separation between the observer and the observed. However, from the standpoint of “bare awareness,” there is not distance between the observer and the observed. Second, although it might appear that completely accepting or embracing a negative feeling might exacerbate it, it reality it doesn’t because once one gets in intimate touch with one’s feelings, they reduce to sensations in various parts of the body. It is when we ruminate about things that they tend to magnify; by contrast, when one is merely observing the negative feelings, they tend to ebb, flow and ultimately dissolve and vanish. This is not to say that it’s always better to try to be mindful when one is feeling negative. Sometimes, it may be better to use one of the “emotion regulation” strategies—if one isn’t fully confident of fully accepting the negative feeling (without ruminating about it).Finally, mindfulness does not lead to a loss of spontaneity even though it increases response flexibility because mindfulness puts us in touch with both what’s going on in our mind and in our bodies. Hence, it enhances both the ability to make mature decisions and maintain spontaneity. What it lowers are the tendencies to be impulsive and over-analytical..













































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